• Trade Publications - Health Professionals - Aus Journal of Dementia Care
  • Trade Publications - Health Professionals - Aus Journal of Dementia Care

$44m boost for dementia training and support

The Australian Government will provide an extra $44 million to extend national dementia training, education and support programs delivered by Dementia Training Australia (DTA)  and Dementia Support Australia (DSA)

Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care Services Senator Richard Colbeck announced in January 2021 that the Government will extend the grant agreements with DTA and DSA for another year, from July 2021 to June 2022.

The programs include the Dementia Training Program delivered by DTA and the three programs delivered by DSA – the Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service (DBMAS), Severe Behaviour Response Teams (SBRT) and Needs Based Assessment (NBA).

The programs deliver support and advice, including clinical support, assessments, recommendations for care interventions, mentoring and capacity building, to primary and acute care staff, aged care service providers and family and informal carers.

The Dementia Training Program delivered by DTA also provides:

  • Continuing professional development training on dementia assessment, diagnosis and management to GPs, nurses, pharmacists, psychologists, specialists, allied health and other relevant professionals.
  • Accredited dementia care vocational level training courses, free to eligible care workers in residential, respite, community care or the wider health services.
  • Tailored onsite training to aged care providers who request assistance, including a dementia skills and environment audit, followed by a tailored training package.

Senator Colbeck said funding for the DTA and DSA programs is available beyond the life of the extended grant agreements, with the final report of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety informing how the programs will be delivered beyond 30 June 2022.

“These programs have delivered great outcomes and significant clinical improvements in recent years,” Senator Colbeck said.

“They have improved the quality of care delivered by thousands of health professionals and care workers to people living with dementia.”

Stock image: Sabine van Erp, Pixabay

Want to read the other articles in this issue? SUBSCRIBE TODAY for as little as $99 to improve your practice and stay up to date on the latest in dementia research and training.

SUBSCRIBE TO AJDC