• Trade Publications - Health Professionals - Aus Journal of Dementia Care
  • Trade Publications - Health Professionals - Aus Journal of Dementia Care

One Response to Putting reablement into practice

  1. […] Reablement is a word in an article about John Quinn, who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s at 56, and how he slows and reverses his symptoms. John went through years of darkness until he decided to begin living his life to the fullest. (Australian Journal of Dementia Care, “Putting Reablement into Practice”, March 27, 2020) https://journalofdementiacare.com/putting-reablement-into-practice/ […]

Be part of Moving Pictures

Be part of Moving Pictures

Moving Pictures, the multi-media project raising awareness of dementia among culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Australia, is starting work on developing resources aimed at people from Vietnamese, Spanish, Greek and Italian communities – and is now seeking family carers of people living with dementia and service providers from these communities who may wish to be involved in the process. Continue Reading

Decoding Dementia winners

Decoding Dementia winners

Dementia Australia has announced the winners of Decoding Dementia 2019, a competition to inspire and promote the use of technology to support people living with dementia.
The winners are: Matiu Bush for Audio Kinetic Jukebox, Nan Yu for My Dementia Companion, Nicc Johnson for Muru Music, and Anne-Louise and Mark Underwood for the MemBo Noticeboard. Continue Reading

Minimising restraint use

Minimising restraint use

Despite overwhelming evidence that antipsychotics are not effective or safe, they are routinely prescribed and administered against clinical guidelines to people living with dementia. To improve health and care outcomes there must be a commitment from all stakeholders to dementia education to eliminate overuse of chemical and physical restraint, supported by a national framework for workforce development, writes David Sykes. Continue Reading

Earle Haven Inquiry

Earle Haven Inquiry

The Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians Senator Richard Colbeck has confirmed that the Morrison Government supports all 23 recommendations made by the report of Inquiry into Events at Earle Haven, produced by Kate Carnell AO and released on 11 November – describing the events at Earle Haven as “devastating, unprecedented and completely unacceptable”. Continue Reading

Govt’s $537m response to Royal Commission Interim Report

Govt’s $537m response to Royal Commission Interim Report

The Federal Government has announced a $537 million funding package in response to the Aged Care Royal Commission’s Interim Report, including $496.3 million for an additional 10,000 home care packages, $25.5 million for aged care medication management programs, and $10 million for additional dementia training and support for aged care workers and providers. Continue Reading

Beyond words

Beyond words

Some AJDC readers may remember Australia’s first television broadcast in 1956. Even fewer might recall that introducing society to television was a cautious decision by the government of the day, influenced by recommendations from the 1953 Royal Commission Into Television. Continue Reading

DTA ‘national peak body’ for workforce dementia training

DTA ‘national peak body’ for workforce dementia training

In a short space of time, Dementia Training Australia (DTA) has established itself as the credible ‘go to’ provider for quality education and professional development for the health professional and carer workforce who are supporting people living with dementia, according to DTA’s new Executive Director Professor Belinda Goodenough Continue Reading

One Response to Human rights, disability and dementia

One Response to Tailored to fit

One Response to Re-designing texture modified foods

One Response to The joy and freedom of dance

One Response to Taking the risk: strategies to support getting out and about

Nurses can make a difference: caring for those living with dementia

Nurses can make a difference: caring for those living with dementia

By TEAGAN BEWICK Bachelor of Science (Nursing) Edith Cowan University, WA Dementia is not an ordinary component of normal ageing. Dementia is characterised by a progressive deterioration of cognitive ability, displaying no distinct symptoms during early development but requiring ongoing assessment as it advances (Hunter, 2016). It demands the provision of personalised treatment and is… Continue Reading

2 Responses to Nurses can make a difference: caring for those living with dementia

Don’t forget the teeth: how can the dental discipline improve the care and well-being of people with dementia?

Don’t forget the teeth: how can the dental discipline improve the care and well-being of people with dementia?

By DANICA ZHAN Bachelor of Dental Science (Honours) University of Queensland Dementia is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that manifests as a decline in multiple areas of function, including memory, communication, and behavioural symptoms. Age is a major risk factor for dementia, and with the burgeoning aging population experiencing greater tooth retention, this corresponds to ever-growing… Continue Reading

ELERA Nursing Prize a token of heartfelt gratitude

ELERA Nursing Prize a token of heartfelt gratitude

The $300 ELERA Nursing Prize, won this year by Edith Cowan University student Teagan Bewick, is awarded in honour of the contribution of the nursing profession to the care and support of people living with dementia and their families and in memory of the prize donor’s parents, who both had dementia in late life and… Continue Reading

One Response to Using sensory stories with individuals with dementia

New resource helps hospitals focus on the person

Hospitals can be stressful and busy places, where someone with dementia may find communication especially challenging. Often a family carer is needed to help explain (and re-explain) issues to hospital staff, and assist them to understand the usual daily routines, needs, and preferences of the person with dementia. In consultation with consumers and an expert… Continue Reading

The DementiaKT Hub: translating research into practice

The DementiaKT Hub: translating research into practice

Belinda Goodenough and Tracy Higgins introduce The DementiaKT Hub – a new one-stop online destination for the latest research-based dementia resources involving DCRC expertise Seventeen years. This is the time lag calculated by a UK-based team as the average wait for a research discovery to impact upon health-related care and treatments (Morris et al 2011).… Continue Reading

One Response to Rethinking respite care

One Response to Making air travel easier for people with dementia

DTSCs aim to create Australia’s first ‘dementia enabling’ university

DTSCs aim to create Australia’s first ‘dementia enabling’ university

Richard Fleming, Lyn Phillipson, Kate Swaffer and Kara Cappetta report on an ambitious pilot project to develop Australia’s first ‘dementia enabling university’, at the University of Wollongong, NSW, where the aim is to inspire and equip students from a range of disciplines to address the growing challenge of dementia            … Continue Reading

One Response to DTSCs aim to create Australia’s first ‘dementia enabling’ university

One Response to Supporting the right to vote

One Response to Igniting the Spark of Life

Shan Crosbie: What are the benefits of engaging with the visual arts in a gallery environment for people living with dementia in Australia?

Shan Crosbie: What are the benefits of engaging with the visual arts in a gallery environment for people living with dementia in Australia?

This essay aims to show that an engagement with the discipline of the visual arts has a vital role to play in the development of a dementia-friendly Australia. During my six-week internship at the Learning and Access department of the National Gallery of Australia (NGA), I was enchanted by the ‘Art and Dementia’ program and… Continue Reading

Giverny Witheridge – The dialogue of dementia

Giverny Witheridge – The dialogue of dementia

Dedicated to my Nonna and Nonno and Nan and Pop – who are living with dementia every day. One of the largest health issues facing older people, their families, service providers and governments in the 21st century is the increasing prevalence of dementia. The term dementia refers to a syndrome caused by disease of the… Continue Reading

One Response to Engaging and connecting through music: enablement in practice

One Response to Inspiring action: checklist for culture change in aged care

  1. […] In the  feature article, Inspiring action: checklist for culture change in aged care, David Sheard outlines his assessment of the state of culture change in dementia care in Australia, based on findings from the Butterfly Care Homes’ 50-point checklist. Read the article   […]

One Response to ‘We are still gay…’: the needs of LGBT Australians with dementia

DIY guide to creating a sensory room

DIY guide to creating a sensory room

Aged care organisations and carers interested in learning more about creating and using multi-sensory environments (MSE) for people with dementia will find a wealth of information in a recent guide written by UK researchers Dr Anke Jakob and Dr Lesley Collier. How to make a sensory room for people living with dementia: a guide book… Continue Reading

One Response to The freedom to imagine

One Response to Playful care: what lies beyond the red nose

One Response to Well-being: a strengths-based approach to dementia

Behind bars: the challenge of an ageing prison population

Behind bars: the challenge of an ageing prison population

A surge in the number of older people with dementia in Australia’s prisons has created complex ethical, legal and medical issues. AJDC covered the topic in this article in our August/September 2012 issue, looking at the challenges and solutions. Alzheimer’s Australia is continuing the discussion with the release of a new paper, Dementia in Prison.… Continue Reading

3 Responses to The power of language

  1. […] The power of language is more important than some would dare to believe, and it is not just simple semantics, but can in fact mean the difference between living with fear or living better with dementia, or being willing to accept the changes of dementia or take one’s own life to avoid the advancing symptoms of dementia. Language is very powerful, perhaps even more than those without dementia can even be bothered to imagine. […]

Knowledge translation matters

Knowledge translation matters

Belinda Goodenough provides a snapshot of highlights from the recent 2014 National Dementia Research Forum in Sydney. This year’s Dementia Collaborative Research Centres’ (DCRC) annual National Dementia Research Forum offered a smorgasbord of ideas and knowledge exchange on ways to get dementia research into practice and policy. Working together – knowledge translation matters was the… Continue Reading

Dementia and diet: modifiable risk factors and dietary prevention

By Sarah Belton Bachelor of Human Nutrition, University of Canberra Dementia is defined as an insidious and progressive neurodegenerative disease that slowly reduces memory, higher intellectual function, and cognitive performance in general. Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of symptoms caused by structural and chemical alterations in the brain, closely linked… Continue Reading

People living with dementia and the built environment

By Holly Keenan Bachelor of Public Health, University of Canberra Introduction Dementia is the term for a group of diseases affecting the brain. Dementia is progressive and irreversible, affecting cognitive, social, emotional and physical functions. Over 30 years, research (Marshall 2001; Fleming, Cookes & Sum 2008; Fleming & Purandare 2010) has proven that dementia-friendly environments… Continue Reading

Occupational therapy and falls prevention for people with dementia

By Monique McIntyre Master of Occupational Therapy, University of Canberra It is estimated that there are over 250,000 Australians living with dementia and this number is predicted to rise to close to one million people by 2050 (Access Economics 2011). Worldwide it is estimated that there are over 35 million people living with dementia and,… Continue Reading

Links between nutrition and dementia

By Serena Shaw Bachelor of Human Nutrition, University of Canberra “Dementia is a mental health disorder that is common in the elderly and has been associated with poor nutritional status”. Dementia is a mental health condition defined by the deterioration in mental cognition with the onset usually occurring later in life1. The disease causes problems… Continue Reading

2 Responses to Links between nutrition and dementia

Tapping into the heart of dementia care

By Tamara Keogh Master of Occupational Therapy, University of Canberra “It is not enough to give a patient [person] something to do with his [their] hands. You must reach for the heart as well as the hands. It’s the heart that really does the Healing” (Ruggles as cited in Carlova 1962, p250) Enabling people with… Continue Reading

Dietary Determinants of Dementia

By Brendan Hutchinson Bachelor of Science in Psychology University of Canberra Discuss the following statement providing evidence for nutrition-related factors associated with the development of dementia and translate this evidence into prevention strategies for the disease: “Dementia is a mental health disorder that is common in the elderly and has been associated with poor nutritional… Continue Reading

Public health interventions – dementia

By Brianan Jones Bachelor of Public Health, University of Canberra An estimated 322,000 Australians had dementia in 2013. Based on projections of the country’s population, ageing and growth, the number of people with dementia will reach almost 400,000 by 2020 and around 900,000 by 2050 (AIHW 2013). The care and management of people with dementia… Continue Reading

The role of occupational therapy for people with dementia in prison

By Connie Koh Master of Occupational Therapy, University of Canberra Introduction The growing number of prisoners with dementia presents challenges for the criminal justice system. While the exact percentage of older inmates with dementia is unknown, with figures ranging from 1 to 44 per cent (Maschi et al 2012), some researchers estimate that the prevalence… Continue Reading

Physiotherapist’s role in preventing dementia

Daniel Baltis Master of Physiotherapy, University of Canberra Dementia is currently Australia’s third leading cause of disability burden and is predicted to become the leading cause of disability by 2016 with an estimated threefold increase in people living with dementia to occur by 2050 (AIHW 2006; ABS 2008b). One factor which may contribute to this… Continue Reading

One Response to Jumping for Joy: Risk and Dementia

One Response to Invisible carers: Young People Caring for People With Dementia

Men’s Sheds put out the welcome mat

Men’s Sheds put out the welcome mat

The result was the pilot project called Every Bloke Needs A Shed. This program was a collaborative effort between the Men’s Sheds in the Hunter region, the Australian Men’s Shed Association and Alzheimer’s Australia NSW (project lead) and funded under the Community Builders program with funding from the NSW Department of Family and Community Services.… Continue Reading

One Response to Men’s Sheds put out the welcome mat

5 Responses to Robots in Dementia Care

One Response to Dementia and the impact of not driving

2 Responses to Food for thought: Facilitating independence with finger foods